this is not an online course

Course Syllabus - AVT 180: New Media in the Creative Arts | Course Outline

Professor: Mark Cooley
Spring 2013
Office hours 5:45 - 7:15 M,W
Appointments: mcooley(at)gmu.edu

Course Description

New Media in the Creative Arts seeks to provide a context for students to experiment with a range of new media tools, while engaging with a variety of practices, concepts, concerns, issues, histories and individuals important to the development of digital culture and media arts.

Course Requirements

Projects: Students complete a series of projects requiring thoughtful, creative and skillful use of appropriate concepts, methods and tools. Projects are to be finished and posted to student blogs before class on the day that they are due.

Student blog: Including project posts and accompanying statements, as well as text responses to assigned course readings.

Participation: Each student is expected to attend all classes, work diligently, complete assignments on-time, participate in discussions and critiques, and to cooperate and collaborate with fellow class members and the professor. In the unlikely event of an absence, students are responsible for getting all missed information from classmates unless extraordinary circumstances require a meeting with the professor during office hours. Class time will not be used to review previously covered material in order to compensate for student absence or inattentiveness. In addition, email concerning information missed or misunderstood because of absence or inattentiveness will not be answered. Instruction will not be conducted by email. Students who make a habit of being unprepared, inattentive, or absent will not pass this course. The professor is happy to help you by appointment during his office hours or possibly by other arrangements. Important note: Students engaged with games, email, facebook, texting, etc. during class will be counted absent.

Deadlines: Unless extraordinary circumstances occur, tardy work will be dropped a letter grade for each class day that it is late. All work, submitted to the professor on-time, may be reworked and resubmitted as many times as necessary until a satisfactory evaluation is received.

Evaluation

The course is divided into six sections: Cut-up/Copy/Paste, Composite, Mashup, Animate, Mockument, Remake. Each of these sections includes written and media-based assignments. Students receive a grade for each section of the course. All grades will be given equal value and averaged together at the end of the semester to obtain a final grade.

A   Work that demonstrates an excellent understanding of relevant tools and concepts by creating engaging and meaningful responses to project requirements. Work that is accompanied by a statement that successfully communicates the artist's intentions and provides meaningful justification for creative decisions.

B   Work that demonstrates a knowledgeable and creative understanding of relevant tools and concepts accompanied by well stated intentions by the artist. Late work that would otherwise warrant an A.

C   Work that satisfactorily meets the requirements of the assignment and displays adequate know-how in the appropriate conceptual and technical tools. Late work that would otherwise warrant an A or B.

D   Work that may or may not meet the minimum requirements of the assignment, yet is unsatisfactory, usually as a result of a lack of commitment on the part of the student to articulate ideas and/or expand vocabulary and know-how. Late work that would otherwise warrant an A, B or C.

F   Work that does not fulfill the requirements of the assignment, excessively late, and/or work that displays very little effort and interest. Late work that would otherwise warrant an A, B, C or D.

Supplies

An appropriate personal data storage device
Output Materials (and costs) as needed
Digital Camera and tripod
Digital Video Camera

General Education Requirements

This class fulfills a General Education Core requirement for Arts. Core requirements help ensure that students become acquainted with the broad range of intellectual domains that contribute to a liberal education. By experiencing the subject matter and ways of knowing in a variety of fields, students will be better able to synthesize new knowledge, respond to fresh challenges, and meet the demands of a complex world.

Arts goal: Courses aim to achieve a majority of the following learning outcomes: students will be able to identify and analyze the formal elements of a particular art form using vocabulary appropriate to that form; demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between artistic technique and the expression of a work’s underlying concept; analyze cultural productions using standards appropriate to the form and cultural context; analyze and interpret material or performance culture in its social, historical, and personal contexts; and engage in the artistic process, including conception, creation, and ongoing critical analysis.

This course satisfies a General Education Foundation Requirement for Information Technology. The purpose of the information technology requirement is to ensure that students achieve an essential understanding of information technology infrastructure encompassing systems and devices; learn to make the most of the Web and other network resources; protect their digital data and devices; take advantage of latest technologies; and become more sophisticated technology users and consumers.

University and School of Art Policies

In accordance with George Mason University policy, turn off all beepers, cellular telephones and other wireless communication devices at the start of class. The instructor of the class will keep his/her cell phone active to assure receipt of any Mason Alerts in a timely fashion; or in the event that the instructor does not have a cell phone, he/she will designate one student to keep a cell phone active to receive such alerts.

Commitment to Diversity
This class will be conducted as an intentionally inclusive community that celebrates diversity and welcomes the participation in the life of the university of faculty, staff and students who reflect the diversity of our plural society. All may feel free to speak and to be heard without fear that the content of the opinions they express will bias the evaluation of their academic performance or hinder their opportunities for participation in class activities. In turn, all are expected to be respectful of each other without regard to race, class, linguistic background, religion, political beliefs, gender identity, sex, sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, veteran’s status, or physical ability.

Statement on Ethics in Teaching and Practicing Art and Design
As professionals responsible for the education of undergraduate and graduate art and design students, the faculty of the School of Art adheres to the ethical standards and practices incorporated in the professional Code of Ethics of our national accreditation organization, The National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Open Studio Hours
SOA teaching studios are open to students for extended periods of time mornings, evenings and weekends whenever classes are not in progress. Policies, procedures and schedules for studio use are established by the SOA studio faculty and are posted in the studios.

ArtsBus - Dates for Spring 2013
February 23, 2013
March 23, 2013
April 20, 2013

ArtsBus Credit

• For AVT degree requirement - students must enroll in AVT 300. This also applies to anyone who intends to travel to New York independently, or do the DC Alternate Assignment.

• If you plan/need to go on multiple ArtsBus trips during a semester and need them towards your total requirement, you must enroll in multiple sections of AVT 300. Please go to the ArtsBus website: http://artsbus.gmu.edu "Student Information" for additional, very important information regarding ArtsBus policy.

• Non-AVT majors taking art classes do not need Artsbus credit BUT may need to go on the Artsbus for a class assignment. You can either sign up for AVT 300 or buy a ticket for the bus trip at the Center of the Arts. Alternate trips must be approved by the instructor of the course that is requiring an ArtsBus trip.

Visual Voices Lecture Series Spring 2013
Visual Voices is a year-long series of lectures by artists, art historians and others about contemporary art and art practice. Visual Voices lectures are held on Thursday evenings from 7:20- 9:00 p.m. in Harris Theater.
Jan 24 Syllabus Review
Feb 7 Anne Harris MisAppearing
Feb 14 Dean Kessmann Meander, Materiality, and Meaning
Febr 28 Kevin Wyllie Finding reverse to go forward – Learning to question fashion before we build.
March 7 Alyce Myatt Media, Art & Money: Alyce’s Adventures in the Screen(s) Trade

Important Deadlines
Last Day to Add Tuesday January 29
Last Day to Drop (No Tuition Penalty) Tuesday January 29
Selective Withdrawal Period – Monday Feb 25 – Friday March 29
Incomplete work from Spring 2013 due to instructor - Friday March 29

Once the add and drop deadlines have passed, instructors do not have the authority to approve requests from students to add or drop/withdraw late. Requests for late adds (up until the last day of classes) must be made by the student in the SOA office (or the office of the department offering the course), and generally are only approved in the case of a documented university error (such as a problem with financial aid being processed) , LATE ADD fee will apply. Requests for non-selective withdrawals and retroactive adds (adds after the last day of classes) must be approved by the academic dean of the college in which the student’s major is located. For AVT majors, that is the CVPA Office of Academic Affairs, Performing Arts Building A407.

Students with Disabilities and Learning Differences
If you have a diagnosed disability or learning difference and you need academic accommodations, please inform me at the beginning of the semester and contact the Disabilities Resource Center (SUB I room 234, 703-993-2474). You must provide me with a faculty contact sheet from that office outlining the accommodations needed for your disability or learning difference. All academic accommodations must be arranged in advance through the DRC.

Official Communications via GMU E-Mail
Mason uses electronic mail to provide official information to students. Examples include communications from course instructors, notices from the library, notices about academic standing, financial aid information, class materials, assignments, questions, and instructor feedback. Students are responsible for the content of university communication sent to their Mason e-mail account, and are required to activate that account and check it regularly.

Attendance Policies
Students are expected to attend the class periods of the courses for which they register. In-class participation is important not only to the individual student, but also to the class as a whole. Because class participation may be a factor in grading, instructors may use absence, tardiness, or early departure as de facto evidence of nonparticipation. Students who miss an exam with an acceptable excuse may be penalized according to the individual instructor's grading policy, as stated in the course syllabus.

Honor Code
Students in this class are bound by the Honor Code, as stated in the George Mason University Catalog. The honor code requires that the work you do as an individual be the product of your own individual synthesis or integration of ideas. (This does not prohibit collaborative work when it is approved by your instructor.) As a faculty member, I have an obligation to refer the names of students who may have violated the Honor Code to the Student Honor Council, which treats such cases very seriously.

No grade is important enough to justify cheating, for which there are serious consequences that will follow you for the rest of your life. If you feel unusual pressure about your grade in this or any other course, please talk to me or to a member of the GMU Counseling Center staff.

Using someone else’s words or ideas without giving them credit is plagiarism, a very serious Honor Code offense. It is very important to understand how to prevent committing plagiarism when using material from a source. If you wish to quote verbatim, you must use the exact words and punctuation just as the passage appears in the original and must use quotation marks and page numbers in your citation. If you want to paraphrase or summarize ideas from a source, you must put the ideas into your own words, and you must cite the source, using the APA or MLA format. (For assistance with documentation, I recommend Diana Hacker, A Writer’s Reference.) The exception to this rule is information termed general knowledge—information that is widely known and stated in a number of sources. Determining what is general knowledge can be complicated, so the wise course is, “When in doubt, cite.”

Be especially careful when using the Internet for research. Not all Internet sources are equally reliable; some are just plain wrong. Also, since you can download text, it becomes very easy to inadvertently plagiarize. If you use an Internet source, you must cite the exact URL in your paper and include with it the last date that you successfully accessed the site.

A note on art and digital technologies:
Digital technologies are particularly suited to copy, sample, or appropriate, mash etc. previously created content. Many artists, visual, audio and literary, have used these techniques quite successfully in order to parody, celebrate or otherwise comment on cultural icons and what they represent. As a class, we will discuss techniques such as these and their relevance to copyright law and the university honor code, but as a rule students should always be up-front and honest with the class and professor as to what visual content has been sampled and how it has been manipulated or rearranged in any given project. Failure to do so will be considered a honor code violation.

Writing Center
Students who are in need of intensive help with grammar, structure or mechanics in their writing should make use of the services of Writing Center, located in Robinson A116 (703-993-1200). The services of the Writing Center are available by appointment, online and, occasionally, on a walk-in basis.

See Academic Calendar for important deadlines, etc.

Course Outline

NOTICE: This course outline indicates a rough guide to where we are headed. However, additions, subtractions and reorganization of course content is likely. You will be informed of any changes during class meetings.  In addition, you should revisit this page routinely. It may be updated throughout the semester.

It should go without saying that this outline, along with the rest of this site, is not a substitute for class attendance and participation.  This is not an online course. You cannot pass this course by relying simply on content provided by this site.  Project descriptions on this site will lack specific technical and conceptual parameters. They should be treated as a resource to accompany in-class lecture, discussion and project descriptions.

W 1/23 - Select / Cut / Paste

Course introduction / blog setup /

Assignment

Blog Text
300 words summarizing The ecstasy of influence: A plagiarism by Jonathan Lethem

Look

Marcel Duchamp 1 2 3
Richard Prince 1 2
Robert Rauschenberg 1
Chapman Bros.
Sherrie Levine
Louise Lawler 1 2
Craig Baldwin
Banksy
Hans Haacke
Andy Warhol 1 2 3
Elaine Sturtevant 1
Seth Price & Kelley Walker
Jeff Koons 1 2 3
John Baldessari
Authorship/Originality 1
aftersherrielevine.com 1
Skip James, Howling Wolf, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin
Lil' Son Jackson, Rock Me Baby, Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Winter, The Rolling Stones 1

John Heartfield  1  2  3 4
Hannah Hoch 1
Max Ernst 1
Edward & Nancy Keinholz 1 2 3
Martha Rosler 1
Peter Kennard 1
Winston Smith  1
Klaus Staeck 1  2
Seán Hillen
Yoshio Itagaki
Tsunehisa Kimura 1 2
Kenneth Hung 1  2,
Martina Lopez 1
Megan Boody 1
Sally Grizzell Larson 1
Tom Chambers 1
Nancy Davenport 1

Make
A photomontage created from several images scanned from a single source. Size 300 dpi. Size 11"x17". Digital image due 10/1, Printed image due 10/3.

M 1/28 - Select / Cut / Paste

Studio

W 1/30 - Select / Cut / Paste

Studio

Work due

Blog Text
300 words summarizing The ecstasy of influence: A plagiarism by Jonathan Lethem

M 2/4 - Select / Cut / Paste

Studio

W 2/6 - Composite

Assignment

Blog Text 2
300 words summarizing The Unreal Person: Portraiture in the Digital Age by Irit Krygier

Look
William Wegman - Family Combinations
Tibor Kalman 1, 2
Nancy Burson
2, 3, 4
Chris Dorley-Brown - Haverville 2000
Daniel Lee
- 2
Jason Salavon - Every Playboy Centerfold 1988-1997
Meg Cranston - The Average American Woman
Gillian Wearing 1, 2,
Don Suggs - Portrait Machine
http://strikingdistance.com/unreal/Pages/irit01.htm

Make
a series of 3 portraits seamlessly composed of 2 or more photos each. Size 300dpi, 11"x17". 100 words on possible interpretations of your work. Digital images due 2/20, Printed images due 2/25

Work due

A photomontage. Size 300 dpi. 11"x17". Digital image due 10/1, Printed image due 2/11.

M 2/11 - Composite

Studio

Work Due

Blog Text 2
300 words summarizing The Unreal Person: Portraiture in the Digital Age by Irit Krygier

W 2/13 - Composite

Studio

M 2/18 - Composite

Studio

W 2/20 - Mashup

Assignment

Blog Text 3
300 words on one of the following:
DJ Spooky / Paul D. Miller. Mixing, Mashup, Remix Culture parts 1-8
RiP: A remix manifesto

Look & Listen
Rossini - Comic Duet for Two Cats
Halim El-Dabh
Pierre Schaeffer 1
Karlheinz Stockhausen
musique concrète video
BBC Radiophonic Workshop
Alan Lomax
Pink Floyd - Ummagumma, Pompeii - Saucer Full of Secrets, Echoes, Money
Kraftwerk
Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution
Brian Eno & David Byrne, Bruce Conner - Mea Culpa from My Life in the Bush of Ghosts
DJ Spooky / Paul D. Miller. Mixing, Mashup, Remix Culture parts 1-8
RiP: A remix manifesto
Negativland
Rebirth of a Nation - DJ spooky
The Grey Album - DJ Danger Mouse 1 2 3
Girl Talk
The Kleptones
Mash-up Breakdown

Make

A 2 minute audio mashup from four or more seemingly opposing sources. Source material must be rendered unrecognizable by your editing and processing. 100 words on your sources and work.

Work Due

A series of 3 portraits seamlessly composed of 2 or more photos each. Size 300dpi, 11"x17". Printed images due 2/25

M 2/25 - Mashup

Studio

W 2/27 - Mashup

Studio

Work Due

Blog Text 3
300 words on one of the following:
DJ Spooky / Paul D. Miller. Mixing, Mashup, Remix Culture parts 1-8
RiP: A remix manifesto

M 3/4 - Mashup

Studio

W 3/6 - Animate

Assignment

Blog Text 4
TBA

Look
Ray Harryhausen
Jan Švankmajer
Brothers Quay
Aardman Animation
Mike Jittlov
Lotte Reiniger, The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926).
Terry Gilliam
Yuri Norstien
Wolfgang and Christoph Lauenstein, Balance (1989).
Ari Folman, Waltz with Bashir (2008).
Juan Pablo Zaramella, Luminaris
Run Wrake, The Control Master , Rabbit
Henry Selick
Kevin Perry, Artic Circle (2010).

Make
a 15 second animation that uses pixilation, object animation or cut-out animation. 100 words on your work.

Work Due

2 minute audio mashup.

M 3/11 - Spring Break

W 3/13 - Spring Break

M 3/18 - Animate

Studio

Work Due

Blog Text 4
TBA

W 3/20 - Animate

Studio

M 3/25 - Animate

Studio

W 3/27 - Animate

Studio

M 4/1 - Animate

Studio

W 4/3 - Mockument

Assignment

Blog Text 5
A Modest Proposal For Preventing The Children of Poor People in Ireland From Being Aburden to Their Parents or Country, and For Making Them Beneficial to The Public By Jonathan Swift (1729).

Look
Zelig, Woody Allen
Waiting for Guffman, Christopher Guest & cast
The Majestic Plastic Bag
Creature Comforts, Nick Park
Garth Marenghi's Darkplace, Matthew Holness, Richard Ayoade

Make
a 1-2 minute video mockumentary. Work collaboratively.

Work Due

a 15 second animation that incorporates pixilation, object animation and cut-out animation. 100 words on your work.

M 4/8 - Mockument

Studio

W 4/10 - Mockument

Studio

M 4/15 - Mockument

Studio

W 4/17 - | Remake

Assignment

Blog Text 6
TBA

Look
Man with a Movie Camera: The Global Remake
Empire uncut
Jillian Mcdonald
Jeremy Deller - Battle of Orgreave (2002)
An-My Le - "Small Wars" (1999–2002)
Corinne May Botz, "The Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death"

Remake
a 15 second segment of a film (to be announced in class).

Work due

Mockumentary. 100 word anonymous evaluation of team members.

M 4/22 - Remake

Studio

Work Due

Blog Text 6
TBA

W 4/24 - Remake

Studio

M 4/29 - Remake

Studio

W 5/1- Remake

Work Due

Remake. 100 words on your work.

M 5/6 - Remake screening. Evaluations / Course review / final blogs due & all project files on dvd or copied to the professor's computer.